Is the line between clinical and consumer health tech blurring? Does it even exist anymore? This week we will be hanging out with best minds in med-tech and biomedical device manufacturing, design, and creation are descending on San Jose CA for BIOMEDevice. We caught up with Dr. Jordi Parramon Head of Hardware and Medical Devices at Verily.

Parramon oversees R&D of diagnostic and bioelectronics, monitoring sensors, smart lenses, wearables, drug delivery devices, and other advanced medical technologies at Verily. Prior to joining Verily, he spent 18 years in medical device R&D at companies including Advanced Bionics, and Boston Scientific.

 

Q&A With Jordi Parramon, Ph.D. of Verily

As the line between clinical and consumer health tech blurs, does this change how OEMs design medical devices?

Dr. Jordi Parramon: OEMS have historically used separate processes for consumer devices versus regulated medical devices. With the convergence of clinical and consumer health, there’s an opportunity for OEMs to think about how they can translate regulated design processes into high-value consumer manufacturing, making designs more compatible and reducing costs through economies of scale.

Jordi Parramon Ph.D
Jordi Parramon Ph.D

 

What will be the next data gold rush in health monitoring?

Dr. Jordi Parramon: The healthcare industry has already started shifting from episodic monitoring to continuous monitoring in order to capture more, richer data and the complexity of human biology as it changes rapidly.

In type 2 diabetes, for example, continuous glucose monitoring through miniaturized devices can provide real-time snapshots into a patient’s health, and highlight the impact of decisions around food and exercise on blood glucose levels. But the next gold rush in health data isn’t just about better, more frequent monitoring for one disease – it’s about combining multiple streams of data (perhaps each with respect to a different condition or aspect of health) to paint a more holistic picture.

 

We have numerous health data collection devices, but is there a realistic way to organize all that data?

Dr. Jordi Parramon: While health information is more abundant than ever, the healthcare ecosystem broadly suffers from siloed access to data and tools to analyze it. With secure, cloud-based software platforms, we can power integration and analysis of multi-modal data — think imaging, genomics, lab tests, and more — to generate better insights and make that information available to providers, health systems, and even patients themselves. At Verily, we’re partnering across the industry and with regulators like the FDA on its digital pre-certification program to develop ideal software frameworks for medical devices. Having the right infrastructure enables us to extract value from data across early-stage research, consumer care delivery as well as regulated medical devices, for example.

 

Attend Dr. Jordi Parramon’s panel discussion on Silicon Valley impacting healthcare tech

As Silicon Valley takes on apps and wearables in the health space, the future of healthcare will change dramatically. Indeed it’s already changing rapidly. In this session, Jordi Parramon, Ph.D. will join a premier panel of experts to discuss how tech will shape healthcare.

Register for the panel discussion here >

 


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